University of Dubuque

Biblical Studies Division


Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative

The course descriptions below represent a listing of courses presently available at the Schools of Theology in Dubuque. Courses may not be available in every instance precisely as described here. Full information on available courses, including objectives, content and requirements, is published each semester and available to all current students prior to registration.

Courses offered at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary are listed first, followed by the listing of courses at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Old Testament | New Testament | Wartburg Seminary Courses


Old Testament

BI 400/500D Introduction to Old Testament Hebrew I
(3 credits)
As an introduction to grammar, syntax and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, the goal is to facilitate beginning stages of reading and exegesis in the Hebrew Old Testament. Some exegetical word studies will provide first steps in the use of lexical tools. Traditional textbook lessons work from nouns through an initial view of the seven verbal stems. This course is highly recommended for certain denominational requirements and may be taken as an elective. Undergraduates by permission only.
Instructor: Matthew Schlimm

BI 403/503D Introduction to Old Testament Hebrew II (Exegesis)
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 400/500D and BI 411/511D.
Continuing with studies into the schemata of weak verbs, the textbook will be used as a reference grammar for biblical readings. Students will apply exegetical methodologies to appropriate narrative and poetic passages in class. They will move into individually written exegesis projects of choice from instructor’s list. These projects on biblical passages will seek to be integrated with the larger course structure. Septuagint Greek may also be employed. This course is highly recommended for certain denominational requirements and it may be taken to fulfill the OT exegesis requirement. Undergraduates by permission only.
Instructor: Staff

BI 411/511D Old Testament Introduction
(3 credits)
Letter grade only
An introduction to the content, historical background, canon, theological and critical issues of the Old Testament. This course fulfills the M.Div. basic first-year requirement in Old Testament studies.
Instructor: Matthew Schlimm

BI 446/546D Bible Survey
(1 credit)
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for reading the entire Bible (NRSV) Old and New Testaments in English.
Instructor: Staff

BI 517D An Introduction to OT Lexicons and Concordances in Hebrew
(1 credit module)
To provide the student who does OT exegesis in English with a basic knowledge of the Hebrew alphabet so that there is access to tools for Word Study which are customarily used by students of the Hebrew language. Instructor: Staff

BI 540D Job: Biblical Perspectives on Suffering (Old Testament English Exegesis)
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 411/511D.
Letter grade (pass/fail optional for those taking course as an elective)
A prime example of biblical Wisdom literature, the narrative and poetry of the book of Job will be studied in light of exegetical methodologies that seek to interpret its meaning for perspectives on suffering. Comparison and contrast of views within the book of Job will move into other perspectives in selected biblical passages. This course meets the requirements for the Old Testament English exegesis in the old and new M.Div. curricula for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail. Biblical languages will be welcomed but not required.
Instructor: Staff

BI 614D Ezekiel: Introduction to the Prophets (Old Testament English Exegesis)
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 411/511D.
Letter grade (pass/fail optional for those taking the course as an elective)
As an example of biblical prophecy related to the Exile, the book of Ezekiel's narrative and poetry will be studied in light of exegetical methodologies to explore the meaning for its time and ours. Comparison and contrast with prophets in the biblical tradition will seek to understand this work in its literary and religious context. This course meets the requirements for the Old Testament English exegesis of the old and new M.Div. curricula for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail. Biblical languages are welcomed but not required.
Instructor: Staff

BI 623D Introduction to Wisdom Literature
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D and a biblical exegesis course. This course fulfills the OT/Biblical Theology requirement.
Letter grade only
Studies in the Wisdom Literature and the Writings of the Old Testament and Intertestamental/post-biblical/extra-biblical sources, especially as interpreted by contemporary scholarship and societal commentary. Special attention will be given to the representation of wisdom as woman.
Instructor: Staff

BI 628 D     Old Testament English Exegesis: Genesis
(3 credits)
Prerequisite:   BI 411/511 D
Letter grade (pass/fail optional for those taking the course as an elective)
This course will study the book of Genesis in English translation, with a focus on the themes, structure, literary artistry, and message of this foundational book of the Bible. Attention will also be paid to critical issues and methods, ancient Near Eastern parallels, and the history of scholarship on the book of Genesis.  This course meets the requirements for Old Testament Exegesis in the M.Div. curriculum if taken for a letter grade.  It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail.  Biblical languages are welcomed but not required.
Instructor:  Amanda Benckhuysen

BI 642D Old Testament Backgrounds of the Four Gospels: Focus on Matthew
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D and a biblical exegesis course.
This course fulfills the OT/Biblical Theology requirement.
Letter grade only
Passages and concepts from Genesis, Exodus, Samuel, Kings, Psalms and Prophets will be studies through the lens of Matthew's portrayal of Jesus. Exegetical methodologies will be applied to comparisons and contrasts with other Gospels and their use of Old Testament passages.
Instructor: Staff

BI 649D Ezra/Nehemiah (Old Testament English Exegesis)
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 411/511D.
This course will study the post-exilic books of Ezra and Nehemiah. These biblical texts will be studied in light of exegetical methods to better understand the re-formulation of the nation of Judah after the exile. This course meets the requirements for Old Testament Exegesis in the M.Div. curriculum for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail. Biblical languages are welcomed but not required.
Instructor:  Melinda Thompson

BI 659D "Opening the Scriptures": The ‘People of God' in the Acts of the Apostles
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D and a biblical exegesis course.
This course fulfills the OT/Biblical Theology requirement.
Letter grade only
Luke alone of the Four Evangelists continues his story of fulfilled salvation in Messiah Jesus through the dramatic splintering of Israel into the "messianic believers" and the "hardened" people of God. This course focuses upon the debate over Israel's scriptures in the proclamation of the apostolic witnesses and the resulting enactment of the "plan of God" which formed a "church" of Jews and Gentiles. What significance today can Acts have for preaching and teaching and for Jewish-Christian and ecumenical Christian dialogue?
Professor: David Moessner

BI 714D Biblical Theology of The Christian "Old" Testament
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI402/502, BI 404/504, BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, BI 657D.
This course fulfills the OT/Biblical Theology requirement.
Letter grade only
Is the "Old Testament" a Christian book or the "Hebrew Bible" of the Jewish communities? This course investigates the ways the church has understood the relation between Old and New Testaments and the differences this conception of one Bible in two parts makes to the church's ministry and priorities for preaching. The identities of "God," "the Lord, Christ," and "the people of God" within this one Book of two testaments form the major issues of the course.
Professor: David Moessner

BI 717D The Old Testament and Paul's Letters
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, BI 657D and BI 658D at least concurrently. This course fulfills the Biblical Theology requirement. NT Greek required.
Letter grade only
This course explores the Old Testament foundations for Paul's theology. What themes does Paul borrow from the Hebrew Scriptures? What exegetical methods does he use? What is Paul's understanding of "salvation history?" Special attention will be paid to Paul's letter to the Romans as the prime example of his understanding of the relationship between God's gift in Christ and the old covenant.
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 721D Study Tour of Israel
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D and BI 450/550D.
A study trip to the Middle East during the January Interim (normally). Readings and orientation sessions prepare participants.
Instructor: a faculty member from either UDTS or WTS.

BI732D Priesthood in Israel
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, and a biblical exegesis course.
This course fulfills the Biblical Theology requirement.
This course explores the history and theology of priesthood in ancient Israel. Various biblical passages are studied to better understand the role of the priest(s) in ancient Israel and how that role influences contemporary ministry. The New Testament concepts of Jesus as Great High Priest (Hebrews) and the priesthood of all believers (1 Peter) are also discussed. This course meets the requirements for Biblical Theology in the M.Div. curriculum for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail.
Instructor:  Melinda Thompson

BI749D Hebrew Exegesis of Isaiah
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 400/500D and BI 403/503D.
This course will utilize the Hebrew text of Isaiah to review, consolidate, and expand students' Hebrew knowledge. Various passages in the book of Isaiah will be
translated to better understand the role of Isaiah's prophetic ministry in eighth-century Israel. Emphasis will be placed on translating and interpreting Isaiah for sermon or lesson preparation. Students who have not taken BI 403/503D may be admitted by demonstrating facility in translating Hebrew. This elective course may be taken for a letter grade or pass/fail.
Instructor:  Melinda Thompson

BI 750D Elijah/Elisha (Old Testament English Exegesis)
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 411/511D.
This course will study the prophetic
ministries of Elijah and Elisha as they are set in the historical narrative of First and Second Kings. These biblical texts will be studied in light of exegetical methodologies to better understand the role of Israel's prophets during the divided monarchy. This course meets the requirements for Old Testament Exegesis in the M.Div. curriculum for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail. Biblical languages are welcomed but not required.
Instructor:  Melinda Thompson

BI 751D Biblical Theology: Isaiah
(2 credits)
Prerequisite: BI502/504, BI511, BI550, and any biblical exegesis course.
This course explores the historical context, content, and theology of the book of Isaiah. Various passages in the book are studied to better understand the role of prophecy in ancient Israel and how that role influences contemporary ministry. The New Testament's use of Isaiah's prophecies are also discussed. This course meets the requirements for Biblical Theology in the M.Div. curriculum for a letter grade. It can also be taken as an elective for a letter grade or pass/fail. Greek is required; Hebrew is welcomed but not required.
Instructor: Melinda Thompson

New Testament

BI 003/004T New Testament Greek
(6 credits for UDTS students)
Letter grade only
An introduction to New Testament Greek offered in a six week class during the summer. Class work and tutorial help are designed to prepare the student for exegetical work. Wartburg M.Div. students receive no credit for this course, which is a prerequisite for admission; UDTS students, however, may take it for eight credit hours (see Schools of Theology in Dubuque Summer Language Program).
Instructor: Staff

BI 402/502D Introduction to New Testament Greek I
(3 credits)
Letter grade only
This course serves as an introduction to the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the New Testament Greek. Its goal, along with Introduction to NT Greek II, is to facilitate reading and exegesis in the Greek New Testament.
Instructor: Amanda Benckhuysen, Annette Huizenga

BI 404/504D Introduction to New Testament Greek II
(2 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 402/502D or equivalent.
Letter grade only
This course will allow students to complete their NT Greek grammar and continue reading in the NT itself. Emphasis will be place upon building vocabulary, identifying verb forms, and becoming familiar with the more nuanced meanings and functions of the participles, all in the service of acquiring the skills of exegesis of the Greek New Testament.
Instructor: Melinda Thompson, Staff

BI 450/550D New Testament Introduction
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: BI 404/504D.
Letter grade only
It is the goal of this course to give students: 1) an increased knowledge of New Testament texts and themes within the first century environment; and 2) a sharpened ability to determine the meaning of scriptural texts by employing interpretive methods designed to investigate their content, form, and context. NT Greek will be used in lectures and in weekly assignments.
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 657D New Testament Exegesis I
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 402/502D, BI 404/504D, and BI 550D.
Letter grade only
Students are introduced to the Greek text of one of the four Gospels and to the specific methods of exegesis designed to illumine the Gospel literary form and its role in the church's faith and witness. Format and organization of the course are based on the theory that the best way to learn exegesis is to apply the principles and methods through the discipline of weekly translation and discussion of the major interpretive issues. Textual criticism will also be introduced.
Instructors: David Moessner, Lyle Vander Broek

BI 658D New Testament Exegesis II
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 657D NT Exegesis I.
Letter grade only
This second required course introduces students to the formal characteristics of ancient letters and to the exegetical methods developed to interpret a Pauline epistle. One of the (shorter) Pauline letters will be interpreted with a goal of translating as much of the Greek text as possible, as well as introducing students to the theology of the larger Pauline corpus.
Instructors: David Moessner, Lyle Vander Broek 

BI 659D “Opening the Scriptures”: The ‘People of God’ in the Acts of the Apostles
(2 credits)
(See course description above under Old Testament)
Instructor: David Moessner

BI 672D Romans
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, BI 402/502D, and BI 404/504D and BI 657D.
A study of Paul's letter to the Romans emphasizing the content and theology of the letter and in-depth exegesis of key passages. Of central importance is the relevance of Romans for the contemporary church.
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 695T Literary Forms in the New Testament
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, BI 402/502D, and BI 404/504D.
Participants will consider such NT literary forms as letter, diatribe, apocalyptic speech, hymns and confessions in Pauline writings, and aphorisms, parable, pronouncement stories, and miracle stories in the Gospels, in order to understand the relationship between literary form and meaning.
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 699D Readings and Directed Research
(3 credits)

BI 700D Intermediate Greek Reading
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 402/502, BI 404/504, BI 657D.
The main objective of this course is to review, consolidate, and expand upon an elementary level of NT Greek in order to prepare for use of the Greek NT in parish ministry. Emphasis will be placed on a rapid reading and interpretation of theologically rich passages from both OT (LXX) and NT for teaching and preaching. Special attention will be devoted to mastering the various nuanced meanings of the participle.
Instructors: David Moessner, Lyle Vander Broek  

BI 717 The Old Testament and Paul’s Letters
(2 credits)
(See course description above under Old Testament)
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 759D The Acts of the Apostles
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 502D, BI 504D, BI 511D, BI 550D, and BI 657D.
Luke alone of the evangelists continues his story of fulfilled salvation through Messiah Jesus in a sequel volume of the dramatic splintering of Israel into the "church" and the "hardened" people of God. One of the overarching questions to be considered is the reason for this "adding on" to the story of Jesus. Is Acts a part of the Gospel, a later development of the Gospel, a new type of writing with a distinctive purpose "extra" to the Gospel? What significance can Acts have today for the life and organization of the church, for preaching, and for Jewish-Christian as well as ecumenical Christian dialogue? This elective course may be taken for a letter grade or pass/fail.
Instructor:  David Moessner

BI 774D Building Christian Community: The Interpretation and Application of I Corinthians
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: BI 411/511D, BI 450/550D, BI 402/502D, and BI 404/504D.
Each unit of this course will carefully exegete a passage in I Corinthians and then consider its implications for community-building in the local church. There will be a strong emphasis upon the integration of the fields of Bible and Ministry. Attempts will be made to use outside resources (i.e. pastors and lay people) to help the class deal with community issues.
Instructor: Lyle Vander Broek

BI 799D Readings and Directed Research
(3 credits)

Wartburg Theological Seminary Biblical Studies Courses

BI 003-004W New Testament Greek
Elementary New Testament Greek. Class work and tutorial help are designed to prepare the student for exegetical work. Wartburg M.Div. students receive no credit for this course, which is a prerequisite for admission. UDTS students, however, may take it for eight semester hours. Wartburg M.A. students receive four semester hours of credit for this course. Offered Every Summer Instructor: Staff

BI 150/151W New Testament Letters and the Book of Revelation
(One Semester Hour - 150, Catholic Epistles and the Book of Revelation; open to M.Div. students)
(Two Semester Hours - 151, entire course; required for M.A. students)
The first half of this course is an introduction to the Pauline letters, including the Pastorals; the second half is an introduction to the Catholic Epistles and the Book of Revelation. The entire course (151) is required for M.A. students. The second half of the course (150) is open to M.Div. students and others who have taken (or are taking) BI 192W.
Instructors: James Bailey, David Lull, or Staff

BI 160W Exegetical Readings in the Greek New Testament
(2 credits)
This course includes weekly translations of selected gospel texts that relate to the course “Jesus and the Gospels,” BI 190W. Attention is given to grammatical and syntactical studies, vocabulary building, and methods of interpretation.

BI 190W Jesus and the Gospels
(3 credits)
An intense study of selected gospel texts that illustrate Jesus’ conflict with the religious, political, and economic forces of his day is coupled with an investigation of the distinctive ways in which the four Gospels recast this Jesus story in terms of their contexts.

BI 192W Pauline Letters and Mission
(3 credits)
A comparative survey of the unchallenged letters of Paul highlights both the occasional nature of his letters and the missional character of his theological and ethical thought. Attention is also given to other letters that form the Pauline tradition.

BI 202W Readings in New Testament Greek
(1 credit)
Designed for students who wish to further their Greek competency, this course involves translating texts from the New Testament and discussing the pertinent grammatical, syntactical, and interpretive issues.
Instructor: May Persaud

BI 204W Readings in Biblical Hebrew
(1 credit)
This course is designed to help students develop their skill in translating Hebrew and building vocabulary. It meets one hour per week during a semester.
Instructor: May Persaud

BI 210W Introduction to Islam
(1 credit)
A study of Islam, its history, beliefs and practices, and opportunities and issues for Christian-Muslim dialogs.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel

BI 212W Overview of the Hebrew Bible
(2 credits)
An introduction to primary texts, themes and historical framework of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasis is on interpretation of texts for ministry (no Hebrew required).
Instructor: Staff

BI 216W Biblical Archaeology
(1 credit)
A study of archaeology in order to note its contributions to understanding the history, culture, and religions of the ancient biblical world.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel

BI 217W Biblical Archaeology Fieldwork
(3 credits)
Study and participation in the summer volunteer programs of an authorized field expedition in the Middle East. Students learn excavation, recording, interpretation, pottery typology, attend lectures on geography and history, and tour other ancient sites. Instructor: Staff

BI 221W Hebrew Bible: Content, Part 1
(2 credits)
This course is “part one” of a two-semester introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Students will become acquainted with a wide variety of Hebrew Bible texts, socio-historical contexts, themes, and issues.

BI 222W Hebrew Language and Bible, Part 1
(4 credits)
This course is “part one” of a two-semester introduction to the Hebrew language and Bible. Students will learn Hebrew in the process of immersion in selected texts. During the two semesters, students will become acquainted with a wide variety of Hebrew Bible texts and contexts, themes and issues.

BI 223W Hebrew Bible: Content, Part 2
(2 credits)
Continuation of Hebrew Bible 1: Content. Students will become acquainted with a wide variety of Hebrew Bible texts, sociohistorical contexts, themes, and issues.

BI 224W Hebrew Language and Bible, Part 2
(4 credits)
Continuation of Hebrew Bible: Language and Content, Part 1. Students will learn Hebrew in the process of immersion in selected texts. During the two semesters, students will become acquainted with a wide variety of Hebrew Bible texts, contexts, themes, and issues.

BI 229W Job
(1 credit)
A study of the literary origin and nature of the Book of Job, some of its important chapters, and the theological problem which the author is addressing.
Instructor: Raymond Martin

BI 244W Interpreting the Bible
(Prolog Week)
(1 credit)
Required for M.Div. middlers, this course considers the topic of biblical hermeneutics. M.A. students take BI 244W or MN 380W.

BI 245(or 6)W Feminist Approaches to Scripture
(1 credit - 245)
(2 credits - 246)
An exploration of various feminist approaches to the Bible, with emphasis on ways these approaches can be a helpful resource in parish ministry.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 251(or 2)W The New Testament World
(1 credit - 251)
(2 credits - 252)
A study of cultural, economic, political, and religious characteristics of the Greco- Roman world in which Judaism and earliest Christianity developed.
Instructor: James Bailey or David Lull

BI 260W Jesus in the Bible and Qur’an
(1 credit)
A comparative analysis of the portrayals, understandings, and roles of Jesus in Christianity and Islam through readings in the Bible and Qur’an.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel

BI 268(or 9)W Parables
(1 credit - 268)
(2 credits - 269)
A study of Jesus’ parables and other sayings, with a focus on implications for preaching and teaching.
Instructor: David Lull or Staff

BI 280W Book of Revelation
(1 credit)
The course emphasizes the historical background and meaning of the Book of Revelation and its number symbolism, with particular attention to key concepts and passages.
Instructor: Raymond Martin

BI 281(or 2)W Apocalypse of John
(2 credits - 281)
(3 credits - 282)
A literary, sociological, historical, political, and theological study of the Apocalypse of John (Book of Revelation), with a focus on key texts for preaching and teaching.
Instructor: David Lull

BI 290(or 1)W Today’s News and the Gospel
(1 credit - 290)
(2 credits - 291)
This course is designed to encourage students to analyze print and electronic media coverage of current events in light of the gospel.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel

BI 297(or 8)W Transforming Bible Study
(1 credit - 297) (2 credits - 298) This course offers a holistic approach to the practice of Bible study, often employing inter-disciplinary methods.
Instructor: James Bailey or Staff

BI 302W Syriac
(3 credits)
Offered by independent study as needed. Grammar and translation. Prerequisites: BI 222W and BI 224W.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 303W Ugaritic
(3 credits)
Offered by independent study in consultation with the biblical division staff. Prerequisites: BI 222W and BI 224W.
Instructor: May Persaud

BI 304W Aramaic
(1 credit)
Offered as needed. Grammar and translation. Prerequisites: BI 222W and
BI 224W.
Instructor: May Persaud

BI 321T Biblical World Study Tour
(3 credits)
This study trip to Israel and Palestine and normally another country occurs during the January Interim. Readings and orientation sessions prepare participants for the experience. A faculty member of the UDTS or Wartburg Biblical Studies Division serves as instructor and tour leader.
Instructor: Staff

BI 325W Traditions of Violence in the Bible and Implications for Today
(3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide a framework within which to understand the dynamics of violence one may encounter in the parish and to develop biblical resources to address it. This will be done through an examination of traditions of violence in the Bible and through discussion of relevant contemporary writings. We will work both in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 327W “Story” in the Hebrew Bible: Resources for Ministry (exegesis)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the narrative genre in the Hebrew Bible. A central emphasis: ways in which the Hebrew Bible narratives can serve as a valuable resource for the parish pastor.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 333W Daniel: Introduction to Apocalyptic
(3 credits)
With Daniel as the primary source, an examination of the nature and function of apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible, intertestamental literature, and the New Testament, with emphasis on the value of apocalyptic literature as a resource for contemporary parish ministry.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 334W The Psalms in Israel’s Worship
(3 credits)
An introduction to the meaning and theology of the Psalms in their historical contexts, with detailed exegesis of selected texts.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel or Raymond Martin

BI 335W Isaiah
(3 credits)
A socio-literary analysis of all or portions of the Book of Isaiah, with emphasis on the form and function of the Zion tradition in Jewish thought at various points in Israel’s history and on implications of this tradition for the New Testament and contemporary expressions of faith.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel or Raymond Martin

BI 336W Jeremiah
(3 credits)
A socio-literary analysis of the Book of Jeremiah and an exploration of Jeremiah’s influence on later biblical writings, with emphasis on the value of this prophetic book as a resource for ministry today.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel

BI 338(or 9)W Post-Exilic Narratives
(3 credits- 338)
(2 credits - 339)
A socio-literary analysis of primary postexilic narratives (Ezra/Nehemiah, Chronicles, Jonah, Esther, Ruth, Suzanna, Judith) with emphasis on their significance both for developing Judaism and early Christianity and also for Christian communities today.
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 340(or 1)W Texts and Themes in the Torah
(3 credits - 340)
(2 credits - 341)
An exploration of a specific theme central to the Torah and to the lived experience of contemporary parishioners (e.g., identity, community, responsibility, grounding of ethical action), with emphasis on meaning arising from the dynamic interplay between the texts in their contexts and modern readers in contemporary contexts (note: themes considered in any given semester will be selected with a view to contemporary issues of major significance).
Instructor: Gwen Sayler

BI 342W Texts and Themes in the Prophets
(3 credits)
An exploration of a specific theme central to one or more prophets and to the lived experience of contemporary parishioners (e.g., ethical action, social responsibility) with emphasis on meaning arising from the dynamic interplay between the texts in their contexts and modern readers in contemporary contexts.
Instructor: Ann Fritschel or Staff

BI 344W Hebrew Bible Pericopes
(3 credits)
Exegesis of selected texts designated for the church year. Preparation of sermons and Bible studies. Prerequisite: Hebrew.
Instructor: Staff

BI 361W Luke’s Revision of Mark
(3 credits)
A study of the Gospel of Luke and its theology in its historical origins and setting, as illustrated by a detailed study of selected texts.
Instructor: Raymond Martin

BI 362W Mark
(3 credits)
A socio-rhetorical, historical, and theological study of the entire narrative of the Gospel, with a focus on key texts for preaching and teaching.
Instructors: James Bailey, David Lull, or Staff

BI 363W Luke-Acts
(3 credits)
A literary, sociological, historical, political, and theological examination of Luke’s s tories of Jesus and the early church, with a focus on key texts for preaching and teaching.
Instructors: James Bailey, David Lull, or Staff 2003-2005 CATALOG | 51

BI 364W Matthew
(3 credits)
A study of the Gospel as a whole and selected texts, designed to develop skills in exegesis and interpretation of pericopes for preaching and teaching.
Instructors: James Bailey or Staff

BI 365W Johannine Studies
(3 credits)
A literary, sociological, historical, and theological study of the Fourth Gospel and letters of John, with a focus on key texts for preaching and teaching.
Instructors: David Lull or Staff

BI 375W Romans
(3 credits)
A study of the background, rhetorical structure, and theology of Paul’s letter to the Christians at Rome.
Instructors: David Lull or Staff

BI 376W Paul’s Corinthian Correspondence
(3 credits)
A study of the background, rhetorical structure, and theology of 1 Corinthians (and sometimes 2 Corinthians).
Instructors: James Bailey, David Lull, or Staff

BI 377W Galatians
(3 credits)
A study of Paul’s Letter to the Galatian churches, with a detailed exegesis of selected texts.
Instructors: David Lull or Raymond Martin

BI 388W New Testament Theology
(3 credits)
A seminar focusing on selected theological themes integral to the New Testament and significant for the contemporary mission of the church.
Instructors: James Bailey or David Lull

BI 389W New Testament Ethics
(3 credits)
A seminar focusing on selected issues integral to the New Testament and relevant for the life and ministry of the contemporary church.
Instructors: James Bailey or David Lull

BI 392W Texts and Themes in the Bible
(3 credits)
A team-taught study of a significant issue or theme as it develops both in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament with emphasis on implications of the study for ministry today.
Instructor: Staff

Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative