University of Dubuque

History and Theology Division

Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative

The course descriptions below represent a listing of courses presently available at the Schools of Theology in Dubuque. Courses may not be available in every instance precisely as described here. Full information on available courses, including objectives, content and requirements, is published each semester and available to all current students prior to registration.

Courses offered at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary are listed first, followed by the listing of courses at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Church History | Missiology and History of Missions | Doctrinal Theology | Historical Theology | Theological Ethics | Directed Research | Wartburg Seminary Courses | Independent Study

Church History

HT 400/500D Early and Medieval Church History
(3 credits)
Letter grade only
This course is the first half of the required two-semester survey of the history of Christianity. Its objective is to familiarize students with the history and teachings of the Christian Church from early in the second century to the beginning of the sixteenth century.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 402/502D Reformation and Modern Church History
(3 credits)
Letter grade only
This course is the second half of the required two-semester survey of the history of Christianity. Its objective is to familiarize students with the history and teachings of the church from the Reformation to the present.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 421/521D United Methodist Studies: History
(3 credits)
This course introduces students to the events, persons, and institutions of the people called Methodists from the time of the Oxford Holy Club to the present. This course fulfills the history education requirement of paragraph 424 of The Book of Discipline for candidates preparing for ordination in the United Methodist Church.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer 

HT 473/573D Church History in Film
(3 credits)
This seminar will examine the history of Christianity as it has been interpreted through the cinema. During each session we will view a film and then discuss it. Students will read on the genre of film and its use in education, as well as reading scholarly studies of the people and events we are seeing on the screen. Assignments will focus on the interpretation of events by the filmmakers and on the use of historical films in ministry.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen  

HT 524D History of Christianity in America
(3 credits)
This course, through lecture, reading, writing, and discussion will investigate the history of Christianity in the United States by examining the major movements, individuals, institutions, and ideas that have shaped Christianity in this nation.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 602D Women in Church History
(3 credits)
This seminar will explore the varied contributions of women to the life of the Church and the varied opinions about women in past ages. We will read a number of recent works on women, as well as selected primary sources. The seminar will focus on women in a particular period of history.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 606D Protestantism in Twentieth-Century America
(3 credits)
This seminar is designed to investigate some of the principal trends in Protestantism in the United States in the 20th century. While the focus will be on mainline Protestantism, we will also address the history of more traditionally marginal communions.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 609D/MN609D Devotional Classics
(3 credits)
Reading and classroom discussion of representative devotional classics from Augustine’s Confessions to Bonhoeffer’s Cost of Discipleship. The two-fold purpose of this course is to introduce these treasures to the student and encourage the student 2003-2005 CATALOG | 53 to develop a theology and practice of devotional life for sustaining ministry.
Instructor: Joel L. Samuels

HT 667D American Puritanism Through Edwards
(3 credits)
In this seminar, we will examine the Puritan tradition in America by reading and discussing primary and secondary works concerning Puritanism, culminating with a more intensive look at writings by and about Jonathan Edwards.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 684D Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism in America
(3 credits)
This seminar will consider the development of evangelicalism and fundamentalism in America by reading and discussing a variety of significant primary and secondary sources.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 685D Denominations and Denominationalism in America
(3 credits)
The reputed “decline” of mainline Protestantism in the past thirty years has brought the issues of denominational identity and change to the fore. Through readings, discussions, and reports, this seminar will investigate the nature and history of denominationalism and selected denominations in America in order to develop a better understanding of the role of denominations in American religion.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 710D American Religious Biography
(3 credits)
This seminar will consider a number of biographical works to better understand the influence of key individuals on the history of religion in America and to investigate the strengths and weaknesses of a biographical approach to American religious history.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

Missiology and History of Missions
(Mission/Evangelism/Contextual Theology core courses are listed under IN section)

HT 417/517D Contextualizing the Gospel
(1 credit)
This module explores the interaction of the Christian gospel with human culture. Using case studies it focuses upon areas where Christianity and culture interact to produce indigenous churches and theologies. Students encounter both the unity and diversity of the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic church.
Instructor: Staff

HT 446/546D God's Missionaries
(1 credit)
This seminar is offered to complement the course MN438/538: Planning and Leading Short-Term Mission Trips. It will explore the context and Christian history of the country that will be the focus of this course: Ghana, West Africa. HT446/546 will provide not only relevant background material on the host country for the summer mission trip, but will provide an understanding about the nature of the mission of God and God's missionaries in Ghana. It is required for those taking MN438/538, but open to others interested in mission in Africa, particularly Ghana.
Instructor:  Bonnie Sue Lewis 

HT 603D Women in Mission
(3 credits)
This seminar will explore the role women have played in world mission and their particular contributions and experiences. Catholic and Protestant, foreign and domestic missionaries of the last three centuries will be examined with special attention given to women of the last two centuries, the context of their ministry within larger mission trends, and their own understanding of their call to missionary work.
Instructor: Bonnie Sue Lewis

HT 631D Native American Christianity
(3 credits)
This seminar is an historical survey of the growth of Native American Christianity in the United States. It will examine the missionary goals and methods employed to missionize Native Americans, the various responses to missionization, and the development of vital and viable Native American Christian congregations. Particular focus will be upon Native American Presbyterians.
Instructor: Bonnie Sue Lewis

HT 632D Native American Ministry
(2 credits)
This seminar focuses upon current ministries within Native American communities. It highlights the work of the church exemplified by various Native American ministers. The course examines the unique context for ministry and evangelism, both on and off Indian reservations, as well as methods of ministry.
Instructor: Bonnie Sue Lewis and visiting Native American Clergy

HT 714D Missionary Impulse in American Protestantism
(3 credits)
This seminar will investigate the motives and methods of American Protestant missionary activity - in the United States and abroad - from the Puritans to present. In so doing we will consider the perennial dilemma between the "civilizing" and evangelizing functions of missions and the relationship between cultural values and Christian missions. Special attention will be given to Native American missions, efforts at social reform, and the role of women in the missionary movement.
Instructor: Bonnie Sue Lewis  

Doctrinal Theology

HT 440/540D Introduction to Christian Doctrine I: The Trinity, Revelation, Creation, Anthropology
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: HT 500D and HT 502D, or permission of the professor
Letter grade only
This course introduces students to the content of the Christian faith as believed and confessed by the Christian church from the early church to the present day. Christian Doctrine I examines the Trinity, revelation, Scripture, authority, method, creation, human nature, and sin. There will be lectures, readings, and discussions. This will include readings and discussions of a variety of contemporary perspectives, such as Third World, feminist, and other theologies.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 456/556D Introduction to Christian Doctrine II: Christology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, Eschatology
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: HT 500D and HT 502D, or permission by the instructor
Letter grade only
This course introduces students to the content of the Christian faith as believed and confessed by the Christian church from the early church to the present day. Christian Doctrine II examines the Person and Work of Christ, the Holy Spirit, salvation, the Church, sacraments, means of grace, the Christian Life, and Christian hope. There will be lectures, readings, and discussions. This will include readings and discussions of a variety of contemporary perspectives, such as Third World, feminist, and other theologies.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 553D United Methodist Studies: Doctrine
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: MN553D United Methodist Polity or HT521D United Methodist History
This course is a basic introduction to the doctrine of the United Methodist Church and the Wesley/Methodist theological heritage. HT553D fulfills the doctrinal education requirement of paragraph 423 of The Book of Discipline for candidates who are preparing for ordination in the United Methodist Church.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 612D/MN 612D The Ministerial Vocation
(3 credits)
This course is devoted to integrative theological reflection on the practice of ministry in dialogue with classical and contemporary writers. Students will work to develop a theological understanding of Christian ministry that can serve to order and integrate their course work in seminary, as well as provide a coherent theological framework for shaping and defining their work as pastors.
Instructors: Leicester Longden

HT 615D Presbyterian History and Confessions
(3 credits)
This seminar seeks to foster an engagement with the theology and ethos of the Reformed tradition. Our work will center around a study of the formative history of the Reformed movement, along with a survey of The Book of Confessions of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This course is strongly recommended for Presbyterian students preparing to take the standard ordination exams in theology.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 619D Traditions in Dialogue
(3 credits)
This course brings the Reformed and Wesleyan/Methodist theological traditions into dialogue by examining selected writings of two major 20th century theologians: Albert C.Outler (Methodist) and Thomas F. Torrance (Reformed).
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 645D Modern Science and Christian Faith
(3 credits)
This course will aid students in understanding some essential aspects of modern science and their impact on contemporary worldviews, as well as in understanding the historical background for the present divergence between science/technology and theology/faith. A non-math, non-technical approach will be used. Questions raised for Christians today by scientific cosmology, modern physics, evolutionary biology and genetic engineering, information and complexity sciences will be discussed, as well as exploring possibilities for dialogue between science and faith.
Instructor: Staff

HT 647D Redeeming the Routines of Ministry and Life: A Theological/ Practical Approach to Ordering Ministry & Life
(3 credits)
This course is designed to help the student develop a theological and practical approach to the problem of ordering his or her ministry and life in the context of contemporary American culture with its increasingly hectic style and pace of life.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 664D The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
(3 credits)
This course examines the biblical, historical, and contemporary development of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. The course deals with the Person and Work of the Holy Spirit in creation, redemption, the Trinity, and Christian community, worship, ministry and mission. The orientation of this seminar is historical, focusing on the early Church’s teaching on the Holy Spirit, the contribution of the Reformation, the rise of the Pentecostal and charismatic movements of the past century, and contemporary conversation.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 665D/HT 313W Confessions and Concord
(1 credit)
Prerequisites: Current enrollment in or past completion of HT212W or HT615D A “comparative symbolics” approach to the Presbyterian Book of Confessions and the Lutheran Book of Concord in light of the “Formula of Agreement” establishing intercommunion between the Lutheran and Reformed churches. Finding commonalities and examining differences are the foci. Knowing the content of HT 212W or HT615D are prerequisites.
Instructors: Gary Neal Hansen, Ralph Quere

HT 734D Liberation and Feminist Theologies
(3 credits)
This course focuses on an appreciative reading of important liberation and feminist theological texts. The first third of the course deals with liberation theology. The remainder covers revolutionary, reformist and evangelical feminist theologies.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 743D Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr
(3 credits)
This seminar seeks to introduce students to the thought of one of the great American theologians and ethicists of the 20th century. The course will emphasize a careful reading of selected texts from Niebuhr’s writings, with an eye toward their ongoing relevance in the life of our church and culture.
Instructor: Staff

HT 754D Contemporary Theology
(3 credits)
This course examines the work of several important contemporary theologians on a particular theme such as Christology, hermeneutics, or the doctrine of the Trinity.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

HT 764D Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin
(3 credits)
This course seeks to develop or enhance students‚ reading-knowledge of ecclesiastical Latin. Students will survey Latin grammar, develop vocabulary and practice reading in theological and liturgical texts from selected biblical, patristic, medieval and reformation sources.
Instructor: Staff

HT 773D The Theology of Karl Barth
(3 credits)
A survey of the Barthian literature – doctrine, exegetical, history of doctrine, political, homiletical and devotional: a digest of the contents of the thirteen volumes of the Church Dogmatics, followed by in-depth study of a selected volume of the Dogmatics or a particular doctrine.
Instructor: Staff

HT 785D The Finality of Christ in a Pluralistic World
(3 credits)
his course introduces students to the current debate about the finality of Christ in our religiously plural world. A variety of perspectives are considered including Protestant and Catholic, female and male, traditional and revisionist, from East and West, and First and Third Worlds.
Instructor: Elmer Colyer

Historical Theology

HT436/536, Historical Models of Christian Prayer, part 1:
Companions in the Way

HT437/537, Historical Models of Christian Prayer, part 2:
Doing the Work of God
(1 credit each)
NO Prerequisites
Each semester of this two-part course will explore five distinct approaches to Christian prayer, all of which have been influential in the history of the Church. Prayer is an elemental expression of faith in God, yet Christians are often dependent on very limited knowledge of what prayer is and how to pray. Pastors need to understand the breadth of Christian teaching on prayer in order to guide others effectively in their spiritual lives. Each model will be studied in primary source texts and through experiential practice.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 584D The Theology of C.S. Lewis
(3 credits)
This seminar will explore the life and thought of C.S. Lewis, one of the most popular lay theologians of the twentieth century, by reading and discussing a variety of his works and key secondary sources.
Instructor: Bradley Longfield

HT 586D The Life and Theology of Martin Luther
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: HT 400/500D and HT 402/502D or permission of the instructor
This seminar will explore the theology of Martin Luther in the context of his life. Martin Luther was the pivotal figure at the beginning of the Reformation, and one of the most influential theologians of all times. We will read from a variety of Luther’s works as well as modern biographical and theological studies. In the process we will encounter crucial issues of Luther‚s theology firsthand and grapple with issues of our own faith.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 637D Mysticism
(3 credits)
This seminar will explore the development and theology of mysticism. Mysticism is one of the primary modes in which Christian theology has been practiced through the centuries, and many great theologians wrote both doctrinal and mystical works. It is also a fertile field of historical and theological scholarship and lay interest. We will examine the tradition through the lens of current scholarship, while spending most of our time reading and discussing primary texts important to the growth of mysticism.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

HT 671D The Theology of John and Charles Wesley
(3 credits)
This course will explore the theology of John and Charles Wesley through extensive reading of primary texts (sermons, theological tracts, hymns, personal journals, letters and diaries). The two-fold goal is first, to understand and interpret these writings within the context of the 18th century, and then to reflect on their relevance to the contemporary theology and praxis.
Instructors: Elmer Colyer

HT 725D Readings in Patristic Theology
(3 credits)
This course will focus on the writing and biography of one ancient church theologian of particular interest, seeking to make available to students the resources of the classical Christian tradition in the service of contemporary ministry. The particular figures studied will vary with different offerings of the course.
Instructor: Staff

HT 749D Augustine
(3 credits)
Augustine of Hippo, a bishop at the turn of the fifth century, guided the Christian church of his day through grave internal crises and the crumbling of Roman civilization. His writings have been among the most influential in all of Western Christendom down to the present day. This seminar seeks to acquaint students with the major contours of Augustine’s life and work through a close reading of selected primary texts and biographical literature.
Instructor: Staff

HT 769D The Trinitarian Theology of T.F. Torrance
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: HT540D & HT556D or permission of the instructor
This course examines the theology of Thomas F. Torrance. Torance is considered to be the most outstanding living Reformed theologian in the Anglo-Saxon world. This course provides students with an overview of Torrance's theology and relates it to discipleship, character formation, the Church and the practice of ministry.
Instructor:  Elmer Colyer

HT 775D The Theology of John Calvin
(3 credits)
Prerequisites: HT 400/500D & HT 402/502D or equivalents or permission of instructor This seminar will explore the theology of John Calvin through a reading of the Institutes of the Christian Religion and consideration of key secondary sources.
Instructor: Gary Neal Hansen

Theological Ethics

HT 688D Christian Social Ethics
(2 credits)
This course will introduce students to major themes, approaches and issues in Christian ethics, with an emphasis on relating biblical Christian faith to contemporary social issues. Students taking this course will gain practical experience in ethical reason and analysis as well as exposure to a number of different approaches to ethical issues.
Instructor: Roger Ebertz

HT 736D Human Sexuality & Christian Faith
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: HT440/540 and HT 456/556 or permission of the instructor
This course will provide an in-depth examination of ways in which Christians have understood the gift of bodies, gender and sexuality in relation to Christian discipleship and vocation. Readings will cover historically influential approaches from both patristic and modern periods. Students in this course may expect to take a step back from the particulars of contemporary moral debates in order to consider the broad-scale theological perspectives that inform various approaches to issues of sexuality and gender.
Instructor:  Staff

Directed Research

HT 699D Readings and Directed Research
(3 credits)
Individual reading or a research project on some phase of history or theology, with the approval and under the guidance of one of the instructors in the division.
Instructor: Staff

HT 799D Readings and Directed Research (Advanced)
(3 credits)
Individual reading or a research project on an advanced level, with the approval and under the direction of one of the instructors in the division.
Instructor: Staff

Wartburg Theological Seminary History and Theology Courses

HT 104W Foundations of the Church
(2 credits)
A survey of the history of Christianity from the second century to the early Middle Ages, looking particularly at the development of the church as an institution, issues of heresy and orthodoxy, ascetical and theological concerns, and Christianity’s evolving relationship with the state. Offered every fall.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 106W Ages of Faith and Reform
(2 credits)
A history of Christianity from the high Middle Ages through the Reformation, focusing on medieval theological developments, the drive towards reform, and the various reformation movements of the 16th and 17th centuries. Offered every spring.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 110W Comparative Reformations: Germany and England
(1 credit)
This course focuses on the history of the Lutheran and Anglican reformations. The causes, means, and results of reform in both lands will be examined through lecture, film, and primary source documents.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 112W Reformations Classical and Radical
(1 credit)
This course will examine and compare the different ideas about reform as expressed by Luther and by more radical reformers such as the Anabaptists. Key themes will include the role of the state, the use of violence, and the different theological understandings of church.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 140W Systematic Theology
(3 credits)
This course will examine God’s multifaceted activity in the history of salvation with an eye to its unity. It will explore the Christian interpretation of the relationship between God, humanity, and the world in its religious plurality in a history that extends from creation and fall to the consummation of all things, and that centers in Jesus Christ. Offered every spring.
Instructors: Winston Persaud, Duane Priebe, Duane Larson

HT 198W Justification and Justice
(1 credit)
This course will explore the evangelistic and social dimensions of the church’s message and mission. The unity of these two dimensions will be interpreted by setting both in the context of the Lutheran doctrine of justification by grace alone through faith alone and the good news of God’s redemptive love for the world in the incarnation, death, and resurrection of Jesus. We will begin to explore the issue of racism in light of the theme of justification and its relation to justice. This will include an intensive anti-racism workshop. Offered every fall.
Instructors: Ann Fritschel, Winston Persaud, Duane Priebe

HT 212W Lutheran Confessions
(2 credits)
A study of the Book of Concord in its main doctrinal themes with foci on modern applications and ecumenical implications.
Instructor: Ralph Quere

HT 214W Medieval Mystics and Reformation Spiritualists
(1 credit)
In this course we shall read and discuss Christian spiritual writings from the 12th- 17th centuries. Selections will include someone from the Middle Ages, such as Hildegard of Bingen, Catherine of Siena, or Thomas ` a Kempis; Martin Luther and another representative of the Reformation era such as Spener, Johann Arndt, Teresa of Avila, or Ignatius of Loyola; and end with a post-Reformation spiritual writer such as John Bunyan or Wesley.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 216W Christian Holy Wars and the Plea for Tolerance
(1 credit)
This course will examine Christian attitudes towards tolerance and intolerance in matters of religion. Major themes will include the concept of Christendom, Crusades, cuius regio eius religio (the ruler determines the religion of the land), the Anabaptist plea for tolerance, and Enlightenment ideas of religious freedom.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 232W The Virgin and the Harlot (3 credit)
A study of women in Christianity, this course looks at the common perceptions regarding women by the church “Fathers” and at the actual roles women filled and the contributions they made in our Christian heritage.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 255W Readings in Black Theology
(1 credit)
The writings of some of the leading Black theologians will be read and discussed. The material read will vary from term to term, and the course may be repeated. The theologian and the material to be read will be announced each term.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 264W Readings in Theology
(1 credit)
The writings of various ancient and modern theologians will be read and discussed. The material read will vary from term to term, and the course may be repeated. The theologian and the material to be read will be announced each term.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 267W Ethics in Lutheran Perspective
(3 credits)
An introduction to the field of Christian ethics, paying particular attention to Lutheran themes: Word of God, law and gospel, theology of the cross, Christian freedom, vocation, reason, and two kingdoms. This course includes analysis of social statements and reflection on the congregation as locus for moral deliberation.
Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 276W Caribbean Theology, Slavery and Colonialism
(1 credit)
An attempt to discern the indigenous ways of conceptualizing the liberating presence and acts of God among the oppressed and suffering during the history of slavery and colonialism in the Caribbean.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 277W Jesus in Missiological Context
(1 credit)
The purpose of the course is to explore several images of Jesus that have emerged in mission contexts, especially in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and Oceania. The implication of these images for mission and evangelism in different contexts will be analyzed. This course is to enable students to recognize and appreciate the emerging plurality in World Christianity.
Instructor: Staff

HT 281W World Religions in America
(2 credits)
As an exploration of the changing religious landscape of the United States, this course will deal with the following world religions, which have a substantial number of followers in the USA: Buddhism, Judaism, Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism. Attention will be given to the origin, history, and basic teachings as identified by the contemporary adherents of these religions. The challenges that religious pluralism poses for Christian witness and presence will be considered.
Instructor: Staff

HT 282W Paradigm Shifts in Mission
(2 credits)
An exploration of major developments and shifts in theologies and methods of mission from the New Testament period to the present time. Special attention will be given to some of the significant contemporary global missiological issues. Required, M.Div.
Instructor: Staff

HT 283W Violence and Religions
(2 credits)
The course will examine historical and contemporary views on the resorting to violence to achieve religious, social, or political goals in a selection of religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism. Attention will be given to the teaching and practice of forgiveness, reconciliation, and peace making within these traditions, and the ecumenical/ interfaith commitment to accomplish them in contemporary society.
Instructor: Staff

HT 285W Ecumenical Movement
(1 credit)
The course will deal with the vision, history, and mission of the ecumenical movement as it is embodied and facilitated through the World Council of Churches. The 60 | 2003-2005 CATALOG UNIVERSITY OF DUBUQUE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY contemporary ecumenical issues/concerns such as inter-church cooperation, church unity, cultural and religious plurality, justice and ecology will be discussed.
Instructor: Staff

HT 286W Introduction to World Religions
(1 credit)
A study of key teachings and practices of major world religions – Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism. Sikhism. Recent developments of cooperation among religions including attempts Towards a Global Ethic‚ will be examined.
Instructor: Staff

HT 290W Doctrine and Hymnody
(1 credit)
The central focus will be on the doctrinal orthodoxy of the hymns used in worship, formal and informal, and on the place of the hymn in the liturgy and worship and its importance as a medium of proclamation of the gospel. Hymns will be chosen from Lutheran and ecumenical hymnals and books of worship.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 292W Theology for Youth Outreach
(1 credit)
Examining and discussing approaches to youth evangelism with a focus on translating the gospel into the “language of the mall.”
Instructor: Ralph Quere

HT 294W Theology of Wartburg Seminary
(2 credits)
Examines the history of Wartburg Seminary and the theology of those who have taught and learned at the school. After examining the mission theology of Wilhelm Loehe, special attention is given to the positions taken by the Iowa Synod and the theological contributions of Sigmund Fritschel, Gottfried Fritschel, J. Michael Reu, and other important figures.
Instructors: Craig Nessan, Bill Weiblen

HT 298W The Gospel and Ideology
(1 credit)
A critical analysis of how “sound” orthodox statements and positions of the church or individual Christians may be more ideological in import than proclamatory. An attempt will be made to grapple with this ambiguity, especially in relation to the preaching and advocacy ministries of the church.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 303W Christianity in the Modern World
(3 credits)
A survey of church history from 1648 to the present, with special attention to the interaction of church and society. Major emphasis will be on experience in Europe and North America, including significant attention to the development of Lutheranism in North America.
Instructor: Roger Fjeld

HT 312W Theology of Melanchthon
(3 credits)
A study of several editions of Melanchthon’s Loci, his dogmatic theological commentaries on Romans as an example of the earliest Protestant systematic theology.
Instructor: Ralph Quere

HT 313W/HT 665D Confessions and Concord
(1 credit)
A “comparative symbolics” approach to the Presbyterian Book of Confessions and the Lutheran Book of Concord in light of the Formula of Agreement establishing intercommunion between the Lutheran and Reformed churches. Finding commonalities and examining differences are the foci. Knowing the content of HT 212W or HT 615D are prerequisites.
Instructor: Ralph Quere, Gary Neal Hansen

HT 316W Theology of Luther
(3 credits)
Major motifs in Luther’s thought centered around justification by faith alone are studied in primary sources. 2003-2005 CATALOG | 61 Interpretations by modern Luther scholars supplement the focus on Luther’s own writings.
Instructor: Ralph Quere

HT 330W Witches Abound: The War Against Women
(1 credit)
During the 16th and 17th centuries, the Church (both Catholic and Protestant) proclaimed war against women, persecuting and killing many as witches. This course will examine the concept of woman as witch – her supposed power and the fears of males, beginning with Tertullian’s accusations against woman as the “devil’s gateway,” to the infamous Malleus Maleficarum (Hammer Against Witches), to the Salem Witch Trials.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 333W Images of Jesus and Christian Identity
(3 credits)
A study of various images of Jesus popular during certain periods of Christian history and their relationship to the dominant culture. We will then examine our own perceptions and images of Jesus, their relationship to contemporary society, and their influence to our individual and corporate Christian identity.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 334W History of Doctrine: Pelikan’s Approach
(3 credits)
A study of Pelikan’s The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine and Jesus Through the Centuries as the context for doctrinal development. The chief object is to understand the major themes of the church’s teachings as they emerged in creeds, confessions, liturgies, sermons and theologies that embody what the church in a given age “believes, teaches and confesses.” Continuity and change as affected and effected by text and context are studied.
Instructor: Ralph Quere

HT 337W Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing
(3 credits)
A study of heresy and orthodoxy in Christian history. The church is not a static institution but a living and growing body continually having to decide what is and what is not truly Christian. This course will look at the process of discernment and examine some of the major heretical movements of the early church and their modern manifestations.
Instructor: Beth Leeper

HT 340W The Trinity: Dogma, Salvation and Doxology
(3 credits)
The focus of this research seminar will be on the biblical and historical development of the doctrine of the trinity, as well as contemporary reinterpretations of the essential triuness of God that are centered in the identity of God as the unity of the triune community of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and in God’s saving action in Jesus Christ. Mystery both in God and in God’s salvation calls forth adoration, praise and thanksgiving.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 342W Eschatology and Creation
(3 credits)
This course will explore the unity of eschatology and creation centered in Jesus Christ. We will examine what that means for how we understand God, humanity, history and the world in conversation with the natural sciences and other religious traditions.
Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 344W Science and Theology
(3 credits)
This course seeks to integrate scientific knowledge into a theological worldview. What are the implications of scientific method, quantum theory, relativity, big bang, chaos theory, and evolution for belief in God?
Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 345W Atonement and Jesus‚ Crucifixion
(3 credits)
This course is an interdisciplinary research seminar that will explore the meaning and significance for human life of the death of Jesus. Interpretations of the crucifixion will be examined in the light of various historical, religious, anthropological, and political contexts.
Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 346W Resurrection and New Life
(3 credits)
This seminar will explore the significance of the confession of the resurrection of the dead for Christian faith, including the issue of death and resurrection, the meaning of Jesus’ resurrection for faith, the relation between Jesus’ resurrection and ours, the place of hope beyond death for life now, and the relation of resurrection to the idea of God.
Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 348W Jesus and the Cosmic Christ
(3 credits)
This research seminar will explore issues surrounding the relation of “cosmic Christology” to the figure of Jesus. Against the background of classical christological debates about the Logos through whom the universe was created and the relation of the Logos to both God and the human figure of Jesus, we will explore this question in relation to two contemporary issues: theology and science and the relation of Christian faith to other religions.
Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 349W The Concept of the Poor in Christian Theology
(3 credits)
The focus of this research seminar will be on texts and contexts in relation to the place and importance of the poor in the history of the church. Primary attention will be given to the biblical witness and writings of the Fathers, Luther and the Reformers, and contemporary theologians. The underlying hermeneutical principle will be the creative interaction of texts and contexts in their presentation of the poor as the locus of God’s presence in Jesus Christ in the world.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 350W The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
(3 credits)
The focus of this seminar will be on the biblical, historical, and contemporary development of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. Our focus will be trinitarian, and a primary area of investigation will be the creedal confession: “I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life. . .”. The overriding focus will be the doctrines of creation, redemption, and sanctification from the standpoint of the Person and Work of the Holy Spirit.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 352W The Church and the Means of Grace
(3 credits)
A study of the nature of the church in the means that the Holy Spirit employs: the sacraments and the church’s ministry of the Word – examined within the Lutheran focus on justification by grace through faith alone.
Instructor: Staff

HT 354W The Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of the World
(3 credits)
In this research seminar, we will examine the biblical, theological, and historical roots of Luther’s “doctrine” of the two kingdoms, with the view to understand how God’s reign through the gospel of Jesus Christ is and is not manifest in the public world of government, ideologies, economics, culture, and the promotion of and struggle for social-economic and political liberation.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 355W Luther and the Religions
(3 credits)
In this research seminar, we will read and critically evaluate both primary texts in Luther and the World Religions, as well as secondary texts which address the question 2003-2005 CATALOG | 63 of a contemporary theology of religions in our religiously plural context.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 356W From Martin Luther to Martin Kaehler to Paul Tillich
(3 credits)
A historical/systematic study of the core of Lutheran theology from its foundation in Luther. Following a review of the historical development after Luther, the course will focus on the creative contributions of Martin Kaehler in his teaching on biblical authority and the doctrine of justification. The course will conclude by analyzing the way Luther’s emphasis on grace has come to expression in Tillich’s theology.
Instructor: Bill Weiblen

HT 358W Paul Tillich’s Systematic Theology
(3 credits)
A study of the basic theological and philosophical roots of Tillich’s thought. The class will engage in reading, analysis, and discussion of the three volumes of the Systematic Theology in order to appropriate some of the intriguing thrusts of Tillich’s concern for the Christian message.
Instructor: Bill Weiblen

HT 359W Moltmann’s Theological Writings
(3 credits)
The concern will be to analyze carefully Moltmann’s treatment of the doctrine of God as Trinity, especially in light of traditional doctrines concerning the Trinity and in order to appreciate the pastoral import of this doctrine.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 360W Luther’s Theology of the Cross and Marx’s Anthropology
(3 credits)
In this research seminar, we will consider texts in Luther and Marx which show how each defined his respective context (religio-cultural, socio-economic, and political) in the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the meaning of human being, and how they articulated radically different responses to the ills of their day. Special attention will be given to the question of how to interpret critically the contemporary context and, consequently, respond to the call to articulate the gospel of God’s justifying grace in Jesus Christ in a world crying out for justice.
Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 363W Dietrich Bonhoeffer
(3 credits)
The life, theology, and ethics of Bonhoeffer are examined within the context of the struggle in Nazi Germany. Bonhoeffer’s biography provides the basis for understanding his theology and ethics.
Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 364W Classical Lutheran Theology
(3 credits)
A study of 17th century theologians such as Gerhard and Chemnitz to show how dependent on their formulations all later Lutheran dogmatics really is. A comparison between the classical formulation and contemporary expression of Lutheran theology will be a crucial part of the course.
Instructor: Bill Weiblen

HT 378W Topics in Interreligious Dialogue
(1 credit)
In a given semester, this course focuses on the dialogues of Christians with representatives of a major world religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, or Islam.
Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 379W Mission in Ecumenical Debate
(3 credits)
This course will analyze and evaluate the reports of the 20th century Conference of the International Missionary Council and its successor World Mission and Evangelism of the World Council of Churches. The course will use the seminar method. Reading the texts of the conference reports and analyzing their theological and missiological content will be the main thrust of the course.
Instructor: Staff

HT 380W Salvation in World Religions
(3 credits)
The language, concept, and understanding of salvation differ from religion to religion and within a religion. The course will deal with some such diversities and will explore its implication for mission and the ministry of the church in a multi-faith context.
Instructor: Staff

HT 381W Christian Encounter with People of Other Faiths
(2 credits)
The course will make a survey of different attitudes and relationships that Christians have developed towards people of other faiths in their missionary outreach, and in the decisions that are made at some of the key missionary and ecumenical meetings. Special attention will be given to contemporary discussions on this issue by churches, ecumenical bodies, and individual theologians such as Stanley Samartha, Hans Kung, John Hick, Diana Eck and Paul Knitter.
Instructor: Staff

HT 386W Constructing Theology with Science (1): Physics and Cosmology
(3 credits)
Here we will explore Einsteinian relativity physics, quantum physics, “newer” physics, and cosmology, along with their implications for various theological topics. No prior expertise in the natural sciences is required, though an introductory course in systematic theology is. The student will learn from such non-theological material, however, so to reconstruct a foundation for a topic of the student’s choice, such as eschatology, the doctrine of creation, etc.
Instructor: Duane Larson

HT 387W Constructing Theology with Science (2): Evolutionary Theory
(3 credits)
We will explore the promises and problems of current dialogue and debate about the doctrine of creation, so-called “creation science,” and evolutionary theory. The student will become familiar with evolutionary theory and be able to articulate it in lay terms, though no prior expertise in the natural sciences is required. Having achieved such familiarity, the student will be able irenically to redress misperceptions of evolutionary science and biblical theology, and will have established a strong constructive theological foundation for teaching on this topic. An introductory course in systematic theology is required before taking this course.
Instructor: Duane Larson

HT 388W Constructing Theology with Science (3): Minds and Brains
(3 credits)
New research in neuro-physiology, artificial-intelligence, information theory, robotics and cybernetics will fund this seminar exploration in theological anthropology; i.e., what it “means” theologically and spiritually to be a human being. As with the other courses in this series, no prior knowledge of the science is necessary, though an openness to its surprises, challenges, and contributions for theology is. Completion of an introductory course in systematic theology is also required.
Instructor: Duane Larson

HT 389W Constructing Theology with Science (4): Cloning and Genetic Therapy
(2 credits)
With the conclusion of initial mapping of the human genome (the biggest intellectual achievement in history), new technologies for stem-cell therapy, genetic “engineering,” and cloning present disturbing and exciting challenges to social ethics. After coming to understand in lay terms the issues and technologies, and considering the theological issues that should be employed to frame answers and praxes of the technology, this seminar will develop a common statement of faith and ethical exhortation to present to a larger public. As with the other courses in this series, no prior knowledge of current natural science is required, though an introductory course in systematic theology is. Instructor: Duane Larson

HT 391W Advanced Tutorial in Bible and Theology
(1 credit) This research seminar will explore issues and insights raised by various articles that touch questions of biblical interpretation and theology with interreligious dimensions. One article will be explored each semester it is offered. The topics will change, and the course may be repeated on different topics. It is open to students at any level who are interested in pursuing advanced research and in approaching topics as independent contributors to the development of the subject matter. The course will often be team-taught. Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 392W Contemporary Theology
(3 credits) This seminar concentrates on recent trends in systematic theology. Significant works are read, discussed, and analyzed. Special attention is given to issues of context. Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 393W Liberation Theology
(3 credits) This is a research seminar which views liberation theology as an ecumenical theology. Attention will be directed to its Sitz im leben. The writings of Latin American and other theologians will be considered in terms of Marx’s influence; the hermeneutic circle; and reformulation of the doctrines of Christ, sin and salvation, church and sacrament, mission and evangelism, and eschatology. Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 394W Liberation Theologies
(3 credits) Liberation theologies are contextual theologies which advocate social change. After examining questions of method, this course will concentrate on the concerns of liberation theologians in
specific contexts: Latin America, North America, Africa, or Asia. Instructor: Craig Nessan

HT 395W Biblical Hermeneutics and Theology
(3 credits) This seminar will explore the intersection between biblical interpretation and theological thought, using the issues involved in interpreting particular biblical texts to address hermeneutical and pastoral questions. The biblical material will vary from term to term and the course may be repeated. Instructor: Duane Priebe

HT 396W The Contemporary Crisis of Defining and Confessing the Gospel
(3 credits) This seminar will examine the biblical witness (both Testaments) to the gospel; explore the Lutheran principle of law/gospel; discern some of the primary and enticing, distorting formulations of the gospel; consider the meaning of the gospel in the encounter with the religions of the world; consider the contemporary meaning of the article on justification as the article by which the church stands or falls (AC, Art. VII); and explore the interrelatedness of gospel, culture, and mission. Ful?lls the senior theology distribution requirement. Instructor: Winston Persaud

HT 397W Christian Apologetics
(3 credits) This course will explore resources for articulating the gospel in light of changing views of the world in modern thought and in light of the objections and alternatives to Christian faith. It will examine apologies for the faith in the history of Christian thought and the possibilities for a modern defense of the faith. Instructor: Duane Priebe

Independent Study
A student may do independent reading or a research project on some phase of history or theology with the approval and under the guidance of one of the instructors in the division.

HT 199W Readings and Directed Research (junior level)
HT 299W Readings and Directed Research (middler level)
HT 399W Readings and Directed Research (senior level)

Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative