University of Dubuque

Integrative/Integrated Courses

Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative

The course descriptions below represent a listing of courses presently available at the Schools of Theology in Dubuque. Courses may not be available in every instance precisely as described here. Full information on available courses, including objectives, content and requirements, is published each semester and available to all current students prior to registration.

Courses offered at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary are listed first, followed by the listing of courses at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Integrative courses are taught by the professors of all three divisions. Integrated courses are normally taught by a single professor.

IN 521D, IN 522D, IN 722D Spiritual Formation Group
(1 credit)
Pass/Fail only
In small groups of eight to ten, students will meet weekly with a faculty member for the purpose of prayer and spiritual formation. They will covenant together to practice individual and corporate spiritual disciplines, combining academic reading with experiential practice. They will seek to inhabit, personally and communally, the primary vision of our seminary, namely, to unify a life of prayer, study and service. Instructor: Staff

IN 581D Theology of Mission and Evangelism
(3 credits)
Letter grade only
This course begins a series of 3 courses on the contextual nature of the Church’s life in mission and evangelism. It seeks to rethink Mission and Evangelism, seeing them both as part of the essence of the Church and of every local congregation. Beginning with the Triune God as a missionary God this course will focus on changing paradigms of mission and its influence on how we do evangelism in today’s post-modern, post-Christendom, pluralistic society. Thus, evangelism and mission are grounded in a missiological ecclesiology. This required course is part I of the Evangelism/Mission/Contextual Theology sequence.
Instructors: Bonnie Sue Lewis, Les Longden

IN 782D Evangelism and Mission in Context
(3 credits) Prerequisite: IN 581D Theology of Mission and Evangelism
Letter grade only
No matter where one does ministry, the shape of that location (context) shapes the form of evangelistic and social mission outreach that is appropriate, effective, and faithful. It is difficult to love people or to worship with them in a vacuum. This course will employ an immersion trip – to a Native American site, a rural location, or an urban center – as well as classroom sessions to help students develop an initial skill at reading contexts for congregational ministry. Building on a theological foundation, it will also ask how context enters into the marrow of evangelism and mission for the location visited. This required course is part II of the Evangelism/Mission/Contextual Theology sequence.
Instructors: Bonnie Sue Lewis, Les Longden, Richard Shaffer

IN 783D The Missional Church
(2 credits)
Prerequisites: IN 581D Theology of Mission and Evangelism and IN 782D Evangelism and Mission in Context
Letter grade only
The church not in mission is not the church. As students prepare to enter parish ministry, this capstone course for the mission/ evangelism sequence will evaluate the key themes involved in the first two courses with an emphasis on implementing a missional church. It will focus on the calling, preparation and “continuing conversion” of the local church required to participate in the “mission Dei” whether it is the small or multi-staffed church, the rural or urban parish. This required course is part III of the Evangelism/Mission/Contextual Theology sequence.
Instructors: Bonnie Sue Lewis, Les Longden

Wartburg Theological Seminary Integrative/Integrated Courses

IN 001W Language and Orientation
(no credit)
This is an intensive language and orientation program required for in-coming TDE students. The program will normally begin in mid-August and continue for three weeks. Generally, the morning will be dedicated to specific English language topics, and the afternoon to life in the United States, the City of Dubuque, and on the seminary campus. Additional tuition required. Offered every summer.

IN 002W Academic Writing
(no credit)
A student whose first language is other than English who wishes to be exempt from taking IN 002W Academic Writing, must demonstrate the necessary competency in written English composition in order for such an exemption to be granted. Goals: 1) To explore, as an interactive writing community, several specific social issues confronting people today; 2) To research such issues in the library and in the community; 3) To write about such issues in various expository modes such as extended definition, process, cause analysis, effect analysis, and comparison and contrast; 4) To take a position on such a specific current issue and defend this position through a well-organized, carefully documented persuasive essay; and 5) To improve writing style through a review of grammar and style. Additional tuition required. Offered every fall.
Instructors: Else Schardt or Staff

IN 003W Graduate Writing
(no credit)
In this module students will focus on writing specific kinds of graduate level papers required in seminary courses. Students will develop the processes for critical analysis, reflection papers, exegetical papers, position papers, and research papers. Grammar and style review will be included in the module. Additional tuition required.
Instructors: Else Schardt or Staff

IN 100W Local Theologies (Prolog Week)
(1 credit)
This course provides a transition from the prior congregational experience of participants into the first semester of seminary. In particular, we will examine our previous contexts theologically, with special attention to the sources, agents, forms, dynamics, and methods of the “local theologies” in which we have been rooted. Offered every fall.

IN 102W Religion, Anthropology, and the Human World
(3 credits)
Against the background of the biblical traditions, this course will explore the religious nature of human beings and the meaning of religion for human life. It will do so in light of the religious and anthropological sciences and the exploration of the Lutheran conviction that God and faith belong together. Offered every fall.

IN 104W Religious Issues in Contemporary Life
(2 credits)
This course will analyze the way religious issues arise in contemporary life and explore how the Christian message addresses these issues and is shaped by them. Offered every fall.

IN 111W Urban Community Development Immersion
(3 credits – January Interim)
This class will meet during the January interim of even years. Students will be placed in church-based contexts where there are community development programs which will expose students to holistic ministry. An action/reflection model of pedagogy will be used.

IN 112W TDE Seminar 1: Introduction to Holistic Development
(1 credit)
Students will be introduced to definitions of the basic terms related to theology, development, and evangelism (TDE), and to the conceptual framework in which the integration of theology, development, and evangelism is seen as essential to ministry and witness through community development. The prevalent theories of community development will be presented and examined. Students will be expected to reflect critically on ways in which holistic development models can be applied in their home countries or in other cross-cultural contexts. Offered every fall.

IN 113W Inquiry Methods for Community Development
(3 credits)
Since understanding context is essential to effective work in community development, this seminar is intended to equip students with knowledge and skills, and to foster attitudes that promote this understanding. Further, this seminar will examine basic types of required information, methods of obtaining primary data, and its compilation and analysis. Offered every fall.

IN 114W TDE Seminar II: Writing a Research Proposal
(1 credit)
This course will take the student through the steps of writing a research proposal, and will culminate in an actual approved research proposal that forms the basis for the student’s summer research project (IN 211W). Normally, students will be in communication with their church leadership beginning the previous semester, concerning the summer’s research project in their home contexts. Students will be taken through the various components needed to complete the proposal, with opportunity given to present their proposals in plenary session. Offered every spring.

IN 115W Ecclesiology and Community Development
(3 credits)
In this course we will study the church as both a theological and as a sociological reality. We will explore biblical images of the church and theological models of the church in conversation with ecclesiastical and social realities in the contexts from which students come. This will include examination of possibilities for how the church relates to society and to the fundamental issues that confront people. It is hoped that constructive images of the church as a community and as God’s people in the world will be of help in forming creative indigenous programs of community development. Offered every spring.
Instructor: Duane Priebe

IN 116W Theological Integration of Accounting, Accountability, and Ethics
(1 credit)
In order to be good, effective and responsible stewards, in both their personal and professional lives, church leaders need to know some of the basics of accounting. This course will expose students to the basic principles of accounting within a theological horizon which integrates understanding of those basic principles with a commitment to a personal and professional ethics of accountability. Offered every spring.

IN 118W Global Economics
(2 credits)
This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand basic macro and micro economic principles from a global perspective. In addition it provides students opportunity to study the concepts, principles, and tools of Global Economics. This course will present a study of selected current and relevant Global Economic Topics. Offered every spring.
Instructor: Staff

IN 206W Theology of the Congregation
(1 credit)
This course develops the idea of pastor as a theological leader in the congregational context. The focus is on understanding the congregation as a center for mission and considering the place of worship, education, fellowship, stewardship, evangelism, globalization, ecumenism, and social ministry in a theology of the congregation. Offered every spring.
Instructor: Craig Nessan

IN 211W Project in Home Context (Summer)
(3 credits)
Students from “developing” countries will return to their home countries/ communities to implement the approved study proposal which they will have developed in the course, IN 114W Writing a Research Proposal. Students who are from “developed” countries will be expected to implement their approved study proposal in a cross-cultural context. To satisfactorily complete this requirement, students will be expected to remain in their specific contexts for two to three months (early June to late August).

IN 212W Presentation of Home Context Projects
(1 credit – Prolog Week)
During the prolog week of the second year, students in the Theology, Development, and Evangelism program will make a formal presentation of their summer projects in their home contexts. Appropriate use of various teaching aids in making these presentations will be expected. Offered every fall.

IN 214W TDE Seminar III: Writing a Research Report
(1 credit)
Utilizing the findings from the summer research project (IN 211W), students will write a complete report of their research by following accepted research reporting standards. This report will include tabulated data given in narrative, table, and graphic format. Conclusions and recommendations will be given. Offered every fall.

IN 215W Methods of Community Development
(3 credits)
This seminar will look at some ways, both positive and negative, in which development occurs and changes community. There will be careful and critical examination of concepts and practical methods for developing community. Special attention will be given to the concept of the development worker as “incarnational agent” who identifies with and lives within the community as servant of Jesus Christ. Offered every fall.

IN 218W Economics of Developing Countries
(2 credits)
Prerequisite: IN 118W This course provides an overview of the economic conditions in developing countries. Emphasis is on social and economic factors underlying economic development. Domestic economic issues of poverty, income distribution, population, unemployment, agricultural and industrial
development education, and other issues will be discussed. This course will incorporate theory and policy. Offered every fall. Instructor: Staff

IN 300W Research Seminar
(1 credit)
This course is designed to assist M.A. students with their major research project and M.Div. students who have chosen the thesis option. These M.Div. students may choose this seminar as an elective. Offered every fall.

IN 302W M.A. Major Research Project
(6 credits)
The project integrates the course work for the degree. It may be in one of the classical disciplines or related to some area of ministry and church life. In the latter case, field work may be an element of the research for the project. Guidance for the project is provided in a research seminar in the fall of the second year. During the second semester of the second year, an informal research seminar may be held. This seminar receives no credit and may meet sporadically. See also the M.A. guide book available from the M.A. coordinator and the catalog entry, M.A. Major Research Project.

IN 303W Youth Culture Mission Project
(3 credits)
The project integrates the course work for the Concentration in Youth, Culture, and Mission. Instructor: Staff

IN 306W The Bible in the Parish
(2 credits)
This course is designed to help students learn how to make biblical study come alive in the parish. If education, especially adult education, is a key to helping congregations become mission outposts, rostered leaders need to be able to offer biblical study in attractive and effective ways. Offered every spring. Instructor: Staff

IN 308W Leaders in Mission: A Theological Task
(2 credits)
Students will reflect on, articulate, and further shape their vision for public leadership in God’s world in and through the church. The class will explore models of the church appropriate for missional ministry in the 21st century in a diverse, pluralistic world. Students will assess and continue to develop their gifts and skills for ministry in a collegial setting as they work together to construct a theology of leadership. Offered every spring.

IN 310W Theology in Transition
(2 credits)
This course is designed to give particular attention to the move from seminary to first call, making use of resource people and materials beyond the seminary itself. It builds on the fact that nearly all of the students are in the assignment, interview and first call process, so it is a good time to address matters of transition. Offered every spring.

IN 311W Vocation (Interim)
(3 credits)
Students will be involved in either (a) a vocational course selected from an area college that meets the student’s particular needs or interests. The student will be required to write a paper, in which she/he will reflect on how the knowledge, skills and attitudes learned in that vocational course would be used in their home country or in a cross-cultural context; OR (b) an ‘on-the-job’ training experience, such as ‘shadowing’ within an industry, service organization, or enterprise. The student will be directly supervised by the person being ‘shadowed,’ with monitoring being done by a seminary faculty coordinator. A final reflection paper will be required. The specific area to be addressed will be finalized through consultation with the appropriate faculty.

IN 313W Ethics, Environment, and Development
(3 credits)
This course will direct systematic theological and practical refection toward environmental issues and sustainable technologies for development. Further, the course will explore and suggest solutions for ethical problems related to economic globalization, southern hemisphere development and the health of the environment from local and global perspectives. Field visits will enhance conversation on readings and lectures. Offered every spring.   Instructor: Duane Larson

IN 314W TDE Seminar IV: Writing a Project Proposal
(1 credit)
Churches and humanitarian organizations are often involved in development projects. These projects normally are the outcome of a written proposal, which may or may not be directed towards a funding agency. Based on the previous summer’s research (IN 211W) and its report (IN 214W), an actual project proposal will be written. Offered every spring.

IN 315W Organizational Capacity Building
(3 credits)
Many projects fail because of poor management. This course will critically examine fundamental organizational structures and how they can be strengthened. Topics will include communication, board control, strategic planning, and resource management, including financial and personnel. Offered every spring.

IN 320W Diaconal Ministry Fieldwork Experience
(9 credits)
This course enables students to perform the noncongregational fieldwork required for the Diaconal Ministry roster in the ELCA. Placement for fieldwork will be determinedin conjunction with the Contextual Education office. Normally students will have completed the Gettysburg Formation Event prior to beginning this fieldwork component.  Required, M.A. in Diaconal Ministry.  Instructor: Staff

IN 321(or2)W Diaconal Ministry Congregational Component Fieldwork
(3 credits)
Students will work with area congregations in situations contracted by the seminary that are tailored to each student's area of specialty. Together IN 321W and IN 322W fulfill the congregational component required for the Diaconal Ministry roster in the ELCA, representing a total of 240 hours of congregational component fieldwork. Required, M.A. in Diaconal Ministry. Fall (IN 321W, Part I) and Spring (IN 322W, Part II)Instructor: Staff

IN 323W Transition for Diaconal Ministry & Mission
(2 credits)
Designed to meet the ELCA roster requirement, this course explores the role of the diaconal minister in church and society. Primary topics to be considered include the ecclesiological and theological dimensions of transition, leadership, and service. Required, M.A. in Diaconal Ministry. Instructor: Staff

IN 324W Diaconal Ministry Fieldwork Extension
(3 credits)
This course enables students who choose CPE as a fieldwork option to perform the minimum of an additional 160 hours of fieldwork needed to fulfill the requirements for the Diaconal Ministry roster in the ELCA. Instructor: Staff

Biblical | History/Theology | Ministry | Supervised Practice of Ministry | Integrative